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Podcast 03 – Working as a Crew member on Hollywood Blockbuster movies and how you can break in.

June 25, 2017 by · Comments Off on Podcast 03 – Working as a Crew member on Hollywood Blockbuster movies and how you can break in. 

Leroy Page:  How to Break into the Big End Film Productions as a Crew member rand how to behave on big film sets with movies stars.  Player at end of page

I have a great podcast this month with Leroy Page, crew member extraordinaire. He has worked on big Hollywood fare here in Australia and has met every star that has worked on these movies. In many cases he has become good friends with them.  Here are some of his credits

·         Aquaman

·         Alien Covenant

·         The Matrix 1,2,3

·         The Great Gatsby

·        Pirates of caribbean 5

·         Mission Impossible

·         And many more movies

In this podcast he will talk about what is necessary to break in as a crew member and work on big movies. He will also talk about how to behave with movie stars so that they may actually like you and treat you well.  

This is fascinating discussion about movie stars and working as a crew member on big movies and invaluable to the up and coming filmmaker and film enthusiasts alike. It is also an entertaining discussion

Enjoy

Colm O’Murchu      Director
http://colmomurchu.com/

If you need filmmaking training to you need a restart in filmmaking, please go to our training on this link.

Podcast 02 – The Process of Editing

June 13, 2017 by · Comments Off on Podcast 02 – The Process of Editing 

It is Colm O’Murchu your host for Filmmaking 101 with Podcast 2.

This week it is just me on my own. Currently I am editing Tabernacle 101 our new one hour 45 minute movie that will be on worldwide release in 2018.

Editing is where the movie is made and the edit decisions and creativity determine the success of any movie. I speak about my process and what I do when I edit my movies.

You can see examples of this on Dealing with Destiny a movie I made some years ago.  Please also note that we have training and film courses for the determined keen filmmaker or enthusiastic beginner on this page.

Podcast Number 1 – Find out how Filmmaker Jon Cohen made his movie Ravenswood and found his audience.

May 23, 2017 by · Comments Off on Podcast Number 1 – Find out how Filmmaker Jon Cohen made his movie Ravenswood and found his audience. 

Today is a very exciting day for me. This is my first of many future podcasts.

In future  podcasts, you will hear from experienced filmmakers. You will hear how they made their movies and found their audience.
This podcast will help the emerging filmmaker to chart their own course to make their own movies and get them seen.

This episode is a fascinating chat with Filmmaker Jon Cohen about his most recent movie Ravenswood.  He made the movie on a budget of 30K and then found distribution in the US and Canada via his sales agent. You can see the trailer here.

As always if you would love to learn filmmaking with the best training in the world, please explore here.

Hear the story of how Jon did it in the following podcast.

20th Anniversary of Australian Film Base – plus my top 8 hot tips for the indie Filmmaker

May 16, 2017 by · Comments Off on 20th Anniversary of Australian Film Base – plus my top 8 hot tips for the indie Filmmaker 

Today is a retro post with my 8 top tips for the Indie Filmmaker at the end of this post. It is now 20 years since we first started our production company Sydney Film Base. At the time we shot numerous music videos, corporates and short films and decided this is how we wanted to earn our living.

We also started the first filmmaking course in May 1997, back in the last century. Since then, I personally have earned my living only from film production or film training. I have never worked for anyone else and have never had to do a day job for money. I have travelled the world and has generally a great time.

As a result of the three month film course , many filmmakers have gone on to make their own film careers and have made some spectacular films. Jack Kelly, Eddie Arya and Sean Smith  who started with us as beginners on one of our film courses years ago are now established filmmakers and part-time teachers on the 3 month film course. Their passion fuels their desire to make films.

In 20 years hundreds of short films have been made on the film courses or as a result of the film courses and many people have made their dreams a reality. Eddie Arya is now on to his third feature film.

In that time, I have personally made four full length feature films that have sold worldwide and had substantial releases in Australia. You can watch both of them on OZFLIX (Links below)

Below,I have listed off the three more recent movies that we have made and details about their releases

Tabernacle 101 is a one hour forty five minute feature film currently in
postproduction.It will be completed in October 2017 and will be previewed and sold to the world wide market at  the prestigious American Film Market in Lost Angeles in November 2017 .

This movie was spooky to shoot and so many strange and unexplained events happened on set.  My production team and I feel we have a very spooky movie that will scare the audience.

______________________________________________________________

Dealing with Destiny: Feature Film 90 minutes Starring Luke Arnold 

  • Nationwide Cinema Release Australia.
  • See Dealing with Destiny now on  OZFLIX  
  • Available on iTunes.

This is a $1 million budget  feature film, made in Australia. I was hired as the Film Director. The film is about the final day of four university students who go on a final day muck up that ends in total mayhem. The film stars Luke Arnold who played Michael Hutchinson of INXS fame in the TV series “Never tear us apart”.  He also played John Silver in Black Sail.  He is now staring in a Hollywood movie directed and starring Heather Graham , Half Magic. It is always great to see actors you have cast go to Hollywood.

__________________________________________________________


The Makeover Trailers –  100 minutes Feature Film –
See it on OzFlix 

  •  Watched 2.701,203  times online and averages about 6000 views per day. 
  • Released Australia New Zealand on DVD everywhere.
  • Oz Flicks
  • iTunes America
  • Pay TV America
  • Pay TV Europe
  • Best Comedy Drama at the New York Film Festival.
  • Available right now on Ozflix 

I Produced wrote and directed and edited this film. I even acted in one scene. The Makeover is a 100 minute feature film staring Lara Cox and Martin Dingle-Wall.  

The Makeover won Best Comedy Drama at the New York Downtown Film Festival. The film was also sold to Pay TV in Europe and on Pay Per view everywhere in the USA. The Makeover has come a viral success on the internet with over 1 million views online and watched thousands of times per day all over the world.

Released on DVD with Blockbuster  everywhere in Australia and New Zealand and on Quickflix (Australian Netflix)  April 2011.

To help you, here is my take and eight hot tips

  • You make a movie when you decide to. Set a deadline and break it down into steps.
  • There is no better learning curve than making a movie
  • Think Audience. Set a target eyeballs that will see your finished movie and go after your audience for your film.
  • People will watch your feature movie in 50 years. Do your level best to make the best movie.
  • Enjoy the process of making your movie
  • Have the best mentors. (For example an excellent film course will help you here
  • Remember setbacks and challenges happen the most experienced and famous filmmaker. Decide that you will overcome what ever is placed in your path.
  • Do as James Cameron suggests. Set a crazy out of reach and massive goal with your movie. If you fail, it will be more than a likely another person’s success and much higher than if you did not set an exceptional goal.

To your filmmaking dreams

Colm O’Murchu

Editing, one of the most important filmmaking skills

May 3, 2017 by · Comments Off on Editing, one of the most important filmmaking skills 

At this moment,  I am editing Tabernacle 101, our 110 minute supernatural thriller movie. I am up at 5am every morning and edit to about 11am and in that time I edit about 1 – 2 scenes per day. There are 150 scenes in the movie, so I expect to complete the first cut during the first two weeks of July.

As I have edited films for over 25 years now and started on steanback flat tables back in the day, I would like to help you with some important advise with editing.

There is quick editing and there is slow editing. Rarely is quick editing any good. On my film courses, I always do my very best to teach, up and coming filmmakers to slow down.  Be fastidious and detailed with their edits and the result will be so much better.

Watch every single take and every single shot that you have shot listed for your scene. Mark off the good sections of each take and you can type in comments for later. When I watch my coverage, I am looking for the best performance from my actors. Therefore as I watch the raw footage,  I am detailing what is best for the edit. I usually have 8 – 10 shots per scene with an average of 4 – 8 takes per shot. That means I usually detail 40 – 50 clips per scene.  That takes about an hour to an hour and a half to watch.

A slow editor watches and details every single clip. A fast editor takes short cuts and cherry picks takes. There is an impatience to get the edit completed. This leads to a poor cut. So slow down and watch every single take and every single clip that you have shot. I type in comments on the best takes so I will know later what is best for the edit.

I enjoy the process of editing the film and take my time. I know, the awards are later with the best possible cut of the film. It may take me an hour to an hour and half to watch every clip. The rule is that I spend as long as it takes.

Once I have watched every single take, I have a  coffee break for 15 minutes.  I need this break to let all of the takes I have watched sink in to my unconsoicous mind.

Then I start to edit. Often the first couple of cuts are the most challenging. Once the cut gets going, a certain rythm sets in and editing comes effortless and fluid. I compare this to a musiscian composing music or a cook creating a great dish.  This is where talent and practice combine to make a great cut.

Often I will have side by sides to make sure that I get the best performance.  A side by side is placing Take 1  , 2  ,3 and  4 side by side on the sequence  to see which is the best performance for that line. It is so easy to see the best performance when you see the same line said four different ways. I pick the best one.

When I do this as the director of the film, I am doing the actor and the film a great service  . Eventually 45 minutes to an hour  or so later I have  a very good cut of the scene.

In low budget filmmaking, editing is a really important skill to learn. You can find a professional editor to edit your film and if time is important this is quicker than learning on your own.

Make sure you work closely with your editor and watch every single take and makes sure that he or she marks off the clips with your thoughts on performance and the takes. Back in the day, we used to have rushes screenings every night after shooting where this process would happen with the editor. I have noticed that at the low budget end of filmmaking, this rarely happens these days.

How does one learn film editing?  First find the best editing software. At International Film Base, we recommend Adobe Premiere Pro. Google it. It usually comes as part of a package called Adobe Premiere Pro CC

They have excellent video tutorials. online and one can learn film editing on their own. This of course is the hard way. I honestly recommend that you learn filmmaking on a reputable film course and learn how to shoot a scene and then how to edit a film by actually doing it on a film course.   On our 3 Month Film Courses we do have post production covered. We have also edit coaches whereby you hire an edit coach to teach you one one one editing. This is the best way of all to learn editing. One can learn the software and editing skills quickly this way. Edit coaching is open to people who have graduated from our 3 month film courses.

Editing is fun but learning how to edit can be  a challenge. Practice makes perfect and the more you actually edit your films, the better you will get.

Till next time, all the very best with your filmmaking ambition

Colm O ‘ Murchu – Director

Transmission and their massive success with the movie “Lion”

April 5, 2017 by · Comments Off on Transmission and their massive success with the movie “Lion” 

Transmission, an Australian Film Distributor, has had massive success in the cinema domestically with the release of Lion.

Now grossing over $25 million Box Office in Australia, it will be one of the top 5 all time Australian Films at the domestic Box Office. In the US, Lion has grossed $125 Million at the box office and been nominated for numerous Oscars and Golden Globe Rewards including Best Picture.  What an achievement for Australia?

If you have not seen Lion, do yourself a favour and see it before it leaves the cinemas. If not, see it when it comes out on ancillary markets such as VOD or DVD or Pay TV.

I was very keen to attend the SPA  (Screen Producers) meeting with the heads of Transmission Richard Payton and Andrew Mackie and find out their take on Film Sales and Distribution.  The breakfast meeting happened at Fox Studios on Tuesday 4th April.

Transmission is an Australian Domestic Distribution company that releases quality films from around the world. They release on average 15 movies per year.

On a good year they will release 4 – 5 Australian Films on the domestic market. This year, Lion has now become their biggest success.

Their take on the market place is that the margin for error has narrowed substantially. Ten years ago they could take a chance on an arthouse title that may or may not make money. Today they have to “think with the head instead of thinking with the heart” when it comes to acquisitions.

The reason for this is the demise of the Blockbuster DVD rentals that was a safety net income ten years ago. VOD has not replaced yet the lost income from DVD.
With Amazon Prime Video and Netflix, the market has substantially changed with subscription websites selling a multitude of product for a small monthly fee.

Netflix never has theatrical releases for movies. You may see some amazing original shows on Netflix but none of them ever have a movie in the cinema before release, spearheading the TV release. This is something that Netflix should change.

Amazon Prime are looking at a theatrical release model which then would lead into series on Amazon Prime.

What can the Australian Producer anticipate when proposing a film project or completed film to Transmission for financing? Approaching Transmission with a developed script must have the following. You must have a fully developed script with an exceptionally successful producer with track record of past hit films.

They only work on four Australian projects per year and they usually get in very early even before the film is shot. For them, a strong producer with credible high profile track record is exceptionally important.

They work in tandem with a sister company called See Saw Films, headed by Emile Sherman and Ian Canning. Former Titles include The Kings Speech and Tracks.

So Transmission is virtually a closed shop for the emerging producer/director. Both Andrew and Richard wished that it was a different market, but financial reality of the current market has made them ultra cautious and anti risk. They would rather go with what is guaranteed to either break even to make a ton of money movies. Taking risks for them means losing money. Most businesses hate to lose money. Australian Films are a tough sell.

On the positive side, if your film is simply an amazing feature film that has intense buzz, it is always worthwhile making sure that all the Australian Distributors see the film. You never know. If your film is something special, there is a chance that a film distributor might take the chance and release the film theatrically.  Optimism is the king of opportunity.

Joel Perlman from Village Roadshow gives a full report on Current Distribution for Movies in the Australia

March 10, 2017 by · Comments Off on Joel Perlman from Village Roadshow gives a full report on Current Distribution for Movies in the Australia 

Roadshow Films has been responsible for releasing box office epics The Hunger Games, The Hobbit, American Sniper, Red Dog, Paper Planes, and six-time Academy Award winning film and monster box office hit, Mad Max: Fury Road.  I attended a Screen Producers event at Fox Studios this morning and the session was illuminating and informative

This is a report of what Joe Pearlman, head of Village Roadshow spoke about at the event.

Joel Pearlman

Listening to Joel’s take on the film distribution in Australia brought me personally up to date on what is happening with film distribution in 2017.  With our feature film/ movie Tabernacle 101. in advanced postproduction, distribution in the Australian Market will soon be a priority.

Firstly, a film distributor job is to maximize the audience and gain the maximum platforms that the film can be seen on. Also, they do their very best to get the best $ return on the films that they distribute.

The Distribution landscape has changed dramatically over the last ten years. Even so, theatrical (cinema) box office in 2016 was a record box office year. However, for boutique art style films, the cinema market has become more challenging.

DVD Rentals at Blockbusters is now more or less extinct, DVD still has a considerable market. Sell Thru on DVD at various shops such as JB HI Fi and Hoyts Kiosks has ensured that there is still plenty of market opportunity in DVD.  Even though, it will never hit the market heights of the 90s and early noughties, the market has stablised and is now growing. It will stay and come stronger just as Vinyl has in music. People love to own a solid physical version of the film.

The big change is in Streaming namely  Netflix, Amazon Prime and Stan in the Australian Market. Many of you may be already members of some of these sites. This is  where many Australian Films find market and they will only come bigger and more dominant over the next decade.

Also a movie star with a great following will always help the film find audience.  Joel gave the example of Dwayne Johnson who is always placing photos on Instagram.

For Australian Films to succeed in the cinema and streaming market, it is important more than ever, to make exceptionally high quality content. Audiences have more choice and are more savvy and producers have to make excellent films to attract an audience. The bar has moved higher. Back ten to twenty years ago, content could be average and still find marketplace. Not anymore.

One of the most interesting facts is how much Roadshow spends on P&A  This is called Prints and Advertising. P&A is what persuades people to go and see the movie. (Special Note: Prints are no longer used in cinemas. But the term is still used.)

In Australia, the the P&A costs per movie released in the cinema are as follows.  (Advertising in all media and online.)

  • Low = $400K to $500K  ( not very effective and films usually do not breakthrough on this amount.
  • Mid =  $1 million to $1.5 million  (much more effective
  • High = $3 million (for big movies (Very effective in Australia.)

Word of mouth with Cinema Releases is far less important as films are given a weekend to one week to perform and if they do not perform in Week 1, they are taken off screens.

It does not matter how good the film is. If it performs poorly week 1, the film dies. However, if they do perform on Week 1 , word of mouth must be urgent and must be exceptional. An example is the Australian Film Lion.  Everyone who has seen it is raving about the film and is telling all of their friends to go and see the film.

This kind of word of mouth works. “You must see Lion it. It’s fantastic” .
This sort of word of mouth has no effect.  “Lion yeah,It’s a good film. Yep I liked it”
This word of mouth while good, does not get people to the cinema unless they are a regular cinema goer.

So what does this mean for the Australian Producer  with Australian Movies.

  1. Make great and exceptional content.
  2. Make sure that you have a international name (star) in your film who has exceptional online presence on Instagram and Twitter. Build a following on Facebook and other social media and get as many emails as possible for people interested in your film and update them regularly. Keep showing photographs from the film on your Facebook and instagram.
  3. Work with a great distributor such as Roadshow and make sure they spend mid to high on P&A

Producers that build online presence via their star and their followings are really helping their chances of success when the film is released.

Till next time

Colm O’Murchu – Director

Joel Perlman from Village Roadshow gives a full report on Current Distribution for Movies in the Australia

March 10, 2017 by · Comments Off on Joel Perlman from Village Roadshow gives a full report on Current Distribution for Movies in the Australia 

Roadshow Films has been responsible for releasing box office epics The Hunger Games, The Hobbit, American Sniper, Red Dog, Paper Planes, and six-time Academy Award winning film and monster box office hit, Mad Max: Fury Road.  I attended a Screen Producers event at Fox Studios this morning and the session was illuminating and informative

This is a report of what Joe Pearlman, head of Village Roadshow spoke about at the event.

Joel Pearlman

Listening to Joel’s take on the film distribution in Australia brought me personally up to date on what is happening with film distribution in 2017.  With our feature film/ movie Tabernacle 101. in advanced postproduction, distribution in the Australian Market will soon be a priority.

Firstly, a film distributor job is to maximize the audience and gain the maximum platforms that the film can be seen on. Also, they do their very best to get the best $ return on the films that they distribute.

The Distribution landscape has changed dramatically over the last ten years. Even so, theatrical (cinema) box office in 2016 was a record box office year. However, for boutique art style films, the cinema market has become more challenging.

DVD Rentals at Blockbusters is now more or less extinct, DVD still has a considerable market. Sell Thru on DVD at various shops such as JB HI Fi and Hoyts Kiosks has ensured that there is still plenty of market opportunity in DVD.  Even though, it will never hit the market heights of the 90s and early noughties, the market has stablised and is now growing. It will stay and come stronger just as Vinyl has in music. People love to own a solid physical version of the film.

The big change is in Streaming namely  Netflix, Amazon Prime and Stan in the Australian Market. Many of you may be already members of some of these sites. This is  where many Australian Films find market and they will only come bigger and more dominant over the next decade.

Also a movie star with a great following will always help the film find audience.  Joel gave the example of Dwayne Johnson who is always placing photos on Instagram.

For Australian Films to succeed in the cinema and streaming market, it is important more than ever, to make exceptionally high quality content. Audiences have more choice and are more savvy and producers have to make excellent films to attract an audience. The bar has moved higher. Back ten to twenty years ago, content could be average and still find marketplace. Not anymore.

One of the most interesting facts is how much Roadshow spends on P&A  This is called Prints and Advertising. P&A is what persuades people to go and see the movie. (Special Note: Prints are no longer used in cinemas. But the term is still used.)

In Australia, the the P&A costs per movie released in the cinema are as follows.  (Advertising in all media and online.)

  • Low = $400K to $500K  ( not very effective and films usually do not breakthrough on this amount.
  • Mid =  $1 million to $1.5 million  (much more effective
  • High = $3 million (for big movies (Very effective in Australia.)

Word of mouth with Cinema Releases is far less important as films are given a weekend to one week to perform and if they do not perform in Week 1, they are taken off screens.

It does not matter how good the film is. If it performs poorly week 1, the film dies. However, if they do perform on Week 1 , word of mouth must be urgent and must be exceptional. An example is the Australian Film Lion.  Everyone who has seen it is raving about the film and is telling all of their friends to go and see the film.

This kind of word of mouth works. “You must see Lion it. It’s fantastic” .
This sort of word of mouth has no effect.  “Lion yeah,It’s a good film. Yep I liked it”
This word of mouth while good, does not get people to the cinema unless they are a regular cinema goer.

So what does this mean for the Australian Producer  with Australian Movies.

  1. Make great and exceptional content.
  2. Make sure that you have a international name (star) in your film who has exceptional online presence on Instagram and Twitter. Build a following on Facebook and other social media and get as many emails as possible for people interested in your film and update them regularly. Keep showing photographs from the film on your Facebook and instagram.
  3. Work with a great distributor such as Roadshow and make sure they spend mid to high on P&A

Producers that build online presence via their star and their followings are really helping their chances of success when the film is released.

Till next time

Colm O’Murchu – Director

Tip 10 – A Director perfects his or her postproduction.

February 23, 2017 by · Comments Off on Tip 10 – A Director perfects his or her postproduction. 

Postproduction is a detailed process and the more detail and quality that is put into the post process, the better the film will be. In the last tip we focused on picture cut which is a very important and major first part of postproduction. Once you have a fine cut of the film, the director is now ready for the  further detail in the postproduction.

Colouring: There is so much latitude with the cameras we use these days. For example the Ursa 4.6 k camera shoots wonderful native raw 4.6K files. This means that the ability to colour and manipulate the visual look of the image, is significant these days. You can make your film look like a Hollywood blockbuster provided you have shot on a professional camera in raw format.   I always hire a really good colourist and direct them to get what I want, for the look of the film. The film genre will determine what the look of the film will be. Is it dramatic or an action film or a supernatural film. Colouring will be  different for different genres.

VFX  ( Visual Effects )
CGI (Computer generated images) has come very common these days. If you are on a budget, it is much better to shoot your practical SFX ( Practical Special Effects) on set. This means creating the magic for real on set. This is fun and it is amazing what you can achieve with practical on set special effects.

Sometimes you will have no choice but to use VFX. Hire the best VFX Artist that your budget will allow. Make sure that you have a VFX supervisor on set. He or she will set up the best Green Screen shots for you.

You need constant advise if you are shooting green screen. Budget will be needed so only use VFX if you absolutely need it. We shot for 14 hours on green screen with Tabernacle 101. We limited our VFX to one long day of Green Screen at studio in Sydney. We  did everything else practical SFX (Special Effects on Set)

Titles ( Credits and other titles on your movie) Self Explanatory. Just like typing in on a Word Document. There is some software options to use. Makes sure you spell everyones names right and get everyone credited.

Sound Design and Sound mixing:
We spend one whole day of the 3 month film course on Sound Design and Sound Mixing with our experience sound designer John Hresc.  It is so important to take this all important step and complete your film professionally. Sound is so important and if you want to make your films look and sound Hollywood, you really need to spend time on Sound Post.

Sound Design involves ADR, Foley, Sound Effects, Atmospheres music and a mix of all the above elements. This area requires a trained professional and when film makers skip this area, generally speaking, the film seems amateur.

My advise is hire someone really good and your film will benefit from their work. Obviously, anyone who enrols on the 3 Month Film Course will learn how to make a film professionally and will also have contacts with Sound Designers that we recommend.  Once again the Director always works closely with an expert sound designer to get the best possible sound for the film.

Music:
On 
very low budget films, many directors will use Stock Music sites such a stockmusic.net.   There is an amazing selection of tracks for movies at $40 per track. This is great if your budget is micro.

With a bigger budget, it is more advisable to hire an experienced film composer who can compose music for your film. This way, you will have the original music for your film that is composed directly for your film.

All you would have to do is watch your favourite movie without music to realise how important music is for you film. Learn this process on our 3 Month Film Course.

Deliverables:  If you are working on a short film, all you have to worry about is your master file which will be at as a high a resolution that you can manage, A DCP ( Digital Cinema Print) if your film is screening at A+ or B+ film festivals and promotional materials about your short film.  This will not cost too much but will be needed if you are serious about your film attracting the best audience.

If you are making a feature film and have a Distributor attached, you will have  list of deliverables that a distributor will require. This can cost $5 -10K depending on this list.

To summarise, a filmmaker needs to put extraordinary effort into Postproduction. Your film will benefit from this and become the movie that you want your audience to see.

The Three Month Film Course is the best way to learn how to make a film professionally. Check out our film courses here and feel free to talk to us anytime about our film courses and services.

Colm O’Murchu Director Australian and International Film Base.

Tip 9 A Director Post Produces

February 13, 2017 by · Comments Off on Tip 9 A Director Post Produces 

A Director needs to make their very best effort in the season of Post Production.

Postproduction on your film is broken down into the following areas.

Tabernacle 101 Still

  1. The Picture Edit.
  2. Colouring
  3. VFX
  4. Titles
  5. Sound Design
  6. Music
  7. Sound Mix
  8. Deliverables

The Picture Edit is the area that most people are familiar with. Many people have basic editing software on their computers and they may have dabbled with picture editing before. They may have completed some very basic effects and coloured the film. Sound Post tends to get ignored totally in this situation meaning that the film feels and comes across as amateurish.

On our film courses, we always use Adobe Premiere Pro software. This is my personal favourite and is what I am using currently as I edit Tabernacle 101.  There are two parts to learning how to edit.

Part One: Learning the software. This part is generally not a huge challenge to learn. You can use the tutorials supplied with the Help section of Adobe Premiere Pro. Or you could have a one on one tutorial with our edit coaches. Often people will learn and come conversant with the software within a matter of weeks.

Part Two: Learning how to edit a film.  It takes time to come a master editor. Some people take to editing very swiftly and learn to edit a film quickly. Other people really struggle to learn how to edit. It really depends on the talent of the person.

Editing goes back to the very first movies in the early twentieth century. It is a skill that was there long before computers. For example, when I first learnt to edit, I learnt on a steenback edit machine which had rolls of work print and magnetic sound tape. It was a cumbersome affair and nothing like the effective non linear editing systems we have now.

Editing takes a special skill. It is like composing music and a good edit is a feel thing that you either have or do not have.  It does not matter how good the film shoot was, if the edit is poor, the film will feel like a poor movie. Pace and choice of edits plays a huge bearing in how the film will turn out.   A great edit will help a movie reach its full potential.

You can do what most people do and hire an editor to cut the film under your direction. If you have the budget, this is a great option, provided you pick an experienced editor who has cut great work in the past. It is also important that the editor is passionate about your film.

Then once the picture edit is complete, you are still only half way to a professional film. Yes there is more. Next Tip 10 covers the next phases of Post Production.

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